The Week's Features
Seven of the industry’s finest to be inducted to Hall, October 12
Herring Motor Company keeps classic line alive
Recovery management and technology services now one
Delivers Class 6 capability in a Class 5 Super Duty package
Recovery “dance” lifts overturned truck
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American Towman Magazine Presents the Week in TowingJuly 17 - July 23, 2019

'Tooned' and Ready

0 a2308By George L. Nitti

Cartoon characters frequently form the basis of tow-truck design themes.

Road Manager Steve Brunet of Robbins Towing in St. Catharines, Ontario, credits his nine-year-old grandson Joseph for inspiring him to use a couple of main characters from the animated movie "Cars" on their 2018 Dodge Ram 5500/Vulcan 994 unit.

"From three years old," Brunet said, "my grandson has been riding in the truck with me and knows how to operate everything. He loved the movie 'Cars.' He said, 'You are towing cars like Tow Mater.' "

With his grandson as a catalyst and using the characters of Tow Mater and Lightning McQueen, Brunet turned to a local graphics company, Auto FX, to help him with the design.

Tow Mater sits center stage on the hood of the unit showing a winch cable extending to the back of the unit, where it is hooked into the red race car, Lightning McQueen.

"Tow Mater is pulling him out of the mud," Brunet said.

The swirling black and orange on the side of the truck draws the eye to the company's logo in a blue-yellow gradient.

One of the biggest challenges in putting the unit together was ensuring that there was plenty of space for Brunet's tools.

"First I needed to find a cabinet that would fit in the back of the truck," he said. "We then created a custom toolbox so that nothing would float around. All of my tools are in there, which I use every day. I do a lot of the crank tows. I do a lot of construction trailers. In the past the tools were put on the floor."

On the back of the truck, just below the lights, lettering clearly states "Slow Down" and "Move Over."

"I find more commercial vehicles slowing down and moving over," Brunet said, "but on average, the motoring public still needs more education. Everyone is in a hurry. Occasionally when I see a tower at work, to help out I'll sit back and block the oncoming traffic."

"I have had a couple of close calls but I wouldn't do anything else," said Brunet, who's been towing for two decades. "It's in your blood. It's in your DNA."

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Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com . You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!
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A Classic with Outstanding Pinstripes

0 7203fBy George L. Nitti

Herring Motor Co. of Somerset, Pennsylvania, has been in business a very long time, operating several trucking-related businesses spanning four generations.

At one point in time, the company served as a distributor/dealership of the Marmon Motor Co., which was a low-production, handmade truck sometimes referred to as "the Rolls-Royce of trucks." However, due to an overcrowded American truck industry and the lack of a nationwide sales network, the last Marmon was made in 1997.

Fortunately, Herring collected a number of Marmons over the life of the motor company and is still using them in their towing and recovery units, including their sprawling, classic 1989 Marmon/Century 5230.

"Over the years we sold a lot of glider kits," said owner Pat Herring, "which included the truck frame, the hood, cab and the sleeper while the other components were added later."

In the vein of their other trucks, this one is painted red, and carries a couple of distinctive features: the classic Herring Motor lettering on the side of the sleeper and the superlative pinstriping done by Casey Kennel of nearby Paint Chops.

On the sleeper, the company name stands out in super-large white lettering like on a billboard. The lettering itself recalls another era, further distinguishing it while its phone number and address sit underneath.

As for the pinstriping, Kennel prides himself as a master pinstriper of East and West Coast new and old school style ... since 1974.

"We have always used pinstriping on our trucks," Herring Manager Ernie Devine said. "The way he (Kennel) sponges it on is old school. He puts paint on a sponge and sponges it on. The paint is real thick."

The lines are done in colorful pink around the unit for a pleasing aesthetic with a timeless feel.

In the world of design, it's the little things that matter next to a name that is bold.

Brag @ TIW!
Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com . You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine.
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© 2019  Tow Industry Week/American Towman Media, Inc.